4 Questions to Ask Before Starting a Big Data Project…

Up to 85% of big data projects fail, often because executives don’t accurately assess the project risks at the outset. Before investing in your next big data initiative, ask these four questions to determine its chances of success.

#1: Is your data valuable and rare? Not all available data is useful, nor is it unique or exclusive.

#2: Can employees use the data to create solutions on their own? You need to decentralize decision-making in order to encourage people to autonomously initiate, create, and adapt solutions.

#3: Can your technology actually deliver the solution? You can have all the data and ideas in the world, but if your technology can only deliver a prototype or a non-scalable solution, your project will fail.

#4: Is your solution compliant with laws and ethics? Even if it’s legal, if users find your solution to be “creepy,” the project is doomed from the start.

Go ahead and use these as your litmus paper test for Big Data Projects…

A short term or a lasting crisis…

“Wake me when it’s over,” is a natural instinct during a short-term interruption in our usual pattern. A crisis is there to be managed or waited out. The goal of each day is to simply get through it. Until things are back to normal.

But sometimes we’re dealing with a lasting crisis. Where the number of days is not small enough to simply throw them away. In a lasting crisis, the pattern of only getting by undervalues our long days and diminishes our ability to contribute.

In this case, we have a chance to accept a new normal, even if it’s temporary, and to figure out how to make something of it. Of course, you haven’t wished for it, but it’s here. There’s very little value in spending our time nostalgic for normal.

When we get to the other side of the lasting crisis and look back, what will we have contributed, learned & created?

Effort and value…

One of my blogs took more than a week to write, 4 hours a day. Another took a total of 3 hours. Both attract the same traffic. The quicker one outdid the other 20 to 1 in traffic.

2 years of product work solves almost exactly the same problem as a one-month product work.
The effort of something is largely irrelevant, people are paying attention to its value.

Your customers don’t care what it took for you to make something – Effort. They care about what it does for them – Value.

Will it ever end?

As we get along in these times, one question always pops up – Will it ever end? Will we go back to normal?

May be or May be not..but is that the right question? If it comes to survival we will survive this… Anything which does not end us makes us stronger.

So the right question should be:

How we can end this?

At the individual level and how to make ourselves better, stronger, and come out of this with flying colors.

Be with action…

In this time of turmoil, we should be with action, rather than thinking impatiently, the action is our only way out…

Don’t think too much what will happen after this…

Don’t think too much whether it can happen to you…

Don’t think too much whether we will come out of this or not…

All of the above we cannot control but we act for ourselves and ensure we can come out of this much better person than what we are…

Less spending on needless things…

In these times, we remember what’s really important. Suffering, be it our own or that of others, prompts us to think.

Who feels like buying fancy clothes now? Who cares about VIP tickets? When you’re forced to reduce expectations and stop living large, you gain space to reflect. A common conclusion is, “Oh, I never needed this, to begin with.”

Suddenly, it’s enough to watch your children play. To read a book or talk to a friend on the phone. If you can’t fill your spare time with distractions, the only alternative is to spend it on what’s meaningful.

Granted, all this reduced spending might not be prolonged, and it might look bad on paper for the world economy — but in the end, it’ll turn us into better humans. We might even use more of our resources to benefit others once we resume business-as-usual.

Cybersecurity during a Crisis…

Cybercriminals love a crisis. With many more people working remotely, they are undoubtedly poised to capitalize on security flaws, but there are several things you can do to protect yourself and your company. Be on the lookout for phishing emails designed to entice you to click on the latest and greatest offer related to coronavirus protections, or with urgent instructions from your boss. Their intent is to get you to unwittingly download malware onto your device and the company’s systems. Make sure your devices are up to date on their anti-virus protection.

Use multi-factor authentication on any accounts for which it is available. Avoid the temptation of using Bluetooth in a public place — it is an easy way for hackers to connect to your device. Only work on secure, password-protected internet connections. If you have to use public WiFi, be sure to verify with the owner that the network to which you’re connecting is legitimate and secured through a password.

Avoid accessing any confidential or sensitive information from a public WiFi network. And be sure to report any lost or stolen device immediately to minimize the risk of fraud.