Effort and value…

One of my blogs took more than a week to write, 4 hours a day. Another took a total of 3 hours. Both attract the same traffic. The quicker one outdid the other 20 to 1 in traffic.

2 years of product work solves almost exactly the same problem as a one-month product work.
The effort of something is largely irrelevant, people are paying attention to its value.

Your customers don’t care what it took for you to make something – Effort. They care about what it does for them – Value.

You Can’t Over Prepare for a Presentation…

Writing a speech or presentation is challenging, and memorizing it takes even more time and effort. But whether you’re speaking at a conference, setting a direction for your team, or persuading upper management to greenlight an idea, it’s important to know your presentation cold.

Transitions can be especially tricky, so break your talk into sections and rehearse the shifts between the sections. Note any troublesome segues and practice them repeatedly. Then, spend time each day memorizing your speech. You might consider recording and listening to it whenever you’re driving, exercising, or running errands. Or you can rehearse a portion of your script right before bedtime or multitask as you brush your teeth.

Finally, have a plan for any slip-ups. Prepare two or three go-to phrases, such as, “Let me refer to my notes,” or “I’m struggling to remember my next point. Let me take a moment and step back.” The lapse will be less awkward for everyone when you don’t panic and do what you need to move on.

Keep Writing Simple…

When you’re writing for work, it can be tempting to rely on industry jargon or big words to puff up your ideas. But overblown language doesn’t make you sound smart, and it can be off-putting to readers.

Most people are drawn to a more conversational tone. So, choose shorter, more familiar words and explain things in a way that anyone could understand. For example, write “things that could affect the merger” instead of “issues potentially impacting the successful completion of the merger.”

Also, whether you’re writing an email or a formal proposal, make sure that your content is glanceable since it probably will be read on a screen — and these days, often a phone.
Assume that your readers will be distracted, busy, and on-the-go.

Formatting can help: Try using subheads, bullet points, diagrams, and tables to highlight your key takeaways. Short sentences and short paragraphs help too.

A good rule of thumb is “one thought per sentence.” If there are too many linked ideas in one sentence, your readers may get lost and just give up.

Focus on the Positives…

Any situation whether its career-related, personal or social we tend to focus on negatives.

“Oh! I don’t know this topic what will happen in Job Interview? “, “let me skip this interview”

“I am not good looking enough to meet her/him”

“My English is not good enough to speak”

There are many such statements that goes in our mind. The main reason to focus on negatives is our ego, in other terms fear of failure. It pushes us to edge, why this happens to me? “The Ego Ahem”

As an intellectual, we always turn to logic in failures while in the success we assume it’s because of self. Whereas this might not be always true.

In any environment, there will be positives and negatives, it’s our choice to focus on one. So which one to focus? Why?

There is a 50% chance of success or failure whether you select positives or negatives. Our best bet is to focus on positives because that’s where we are good at!

Also focusing on positives makes us happier and we are willing to work harder.

Hence let’s focus on positives, be happy and achieve success more often than failures.

Should You Disagree in a Job Interview?

When you express your honest opinion during an interview, you present yourself as you are, not as who you think the employer wants you to be. But disagreeing with an interviewer isn’t always easy because of the imbalance of power. Navigate the potential downsides by doing a few things before and during the interview.

First, research the company. Is the culture one where people are receptive to new ideas? Are the organization and its founders are known for inclusion and open-mindedness or do they have a slow-moving, legacy mindset? During the meeting, if the interviewer asks a question that gives you pause, resist the urge to answer immediately.

Take time to formulate a thoughtful response. And ask for permission to provide a different viewpoint. Say something like: “I see this differently. May I share my perspective with you?” Of course, follow your gut. If you think disagreeing won’t be well-received, then bite your tongue.

If the interviewer made you uncomfortable — if you felt dismissed or unheard — trust your instincts. When expressing differing opinions isn’t welcomed in an interview, it probably won’t be encouraged once you’re part of the company.

In the Cocoon…

We all have our “Wall of Safety” that gives us a comfort zone.

For child, its the parent that doesn’t allow risking.

For adults, it is the social norms that doesn’t allow risking.

For poor, it is the daily wages that doesn’t allow risking.

For richer, it is the steady income that doesn’t allow risking.

It’s a cocoon to protect and allow us a path. On introspection, there are a lot of cocoons safeguarding us. While it keeps us comfortable it creates restrictions and boundaries.

Unless we break out, we will keep continuing what we are. But there is always a choice to explore, be different, perhaps better. Or be in the cocoon.