Anger As A Story…

Anger is imaginary. We create it through inner dialogue and imagination. We convince ourselves that we ought to be angry. Anger is a story we tell ourselves.

Instead of getting angry, try to find a solution to the perceived problem. If you can’t find one, maybe it’s not yours to find.

Work Stress Keeping You Up at Night…

Work stress is inevitable, but it doesn’t have to get in the way of a good night’s sleep. Try these strategies during the day to avoid worrying about work at all hours of the night.

Make a to-do list. The act of writing down uncompleted tasks allows us to put them out of mind.

Keeping a journal, where you write down thoughts and feelings. Putting pen to paper can help process emotions and reduce anxiety.

Get some exercise. Physical activity — even a single instance — decreases rumination, which is often linked to insomnia.

Practice meditation. Researchers have found that even small amounts of mindful meditation (10 minutes before and after work for two weeks) helped calm racing minds and improved sleep quality and duration.

Lastly, be easy on yourself. Self-compassion can often break the cycle of negative thoughts that keeps you up.

Work stress may be inevitable at times, but these strategies can increase our ability to wake up feeling refreshed and able to tackle the biggest challenges.

Big problems in life…

When a problem appears too large, too intractable, and too unspeakable to deal with, it’s easy to give up.

There never seems to be enough time, enough resources, or enough money to make the big problems go away.

Perhaps we can start with a very small part of it. One task, one opportunity, one step.

Drip by drip, with commitment.

Those are the two hard parts. The insight to do it drip by drip and the persistence to commit to it.

Do it now or never…

Remember the thing you were deeply passionate about, what you felt you were “made for”? You still have what it takes to do it.

The truth is that no one holds the answers for your life; you must find them for yourself.

You can either dismiss this truth and end up filling your life with regret. Or you can embrace this truth and fill your life with learnings that make memorable and happy.

What will you choose? – Do it now or never

Let’s Reframe Challenges to Cope with Uncertainty…

We are all dealing with unprecedented — and seemingly endless — uncertainty right now.

While we may not have as much clarity as we like, we can avoid feeling disoriented by developing an “uncertainty capability” and reframing our outlook on the unknown.

Some common reframes include:

Learning. Let’s ask ourselves what we can learn from the situation rather than automatically viewing it as a setback.

Games. Remember that we win some and lose some.

Gratitude. Recognize what we already have and be thankful for it.

Randomness. A lot of life is random. What happens isn’t always our doing.

Without a clear end to the pandemic in sight, it’s important that we develop and sustain a healthy relationship with the things we don’t know and can’t control.

These shifts in what we think about uncertainty will help us build resilience and a positive outlook.

Learning Tools…

How good are you at Google Sheet?

Can you write a query? A filter? Do you know how to install add-on tools to trim extra cells or create a mail merge? If you wanted to learn those things, do you know how to find out how?

It’s an interesting litmus test.

Google Sheet is not particularly difficult to use.

You can explore it in private, with no fear of screwing up. And it’s widely applicable to just about any career or community work you might choose to do.

If you get good at a type of technology, you’ll find yourself using it often. On the other hand, if you decide that you’re somehow untalented at it (which is untrue) or don’t take the time, then you’ll have sacrificed leverage and confidence that were offered to you.

Of course, it’s not just Sheets, or the web, or even computers. It’s a posture of possibility when it comes to the tools we’re able to use.

We can ignore the tools that we have access to. We can fear them. We can understand them.

(And, after we understand them, we’re able to hire someone else to use them on our behalf.)

We can even master them.